Medicinal

Henna has medicinal properties as well. Ibn Qayyim says, “When headache is from a burning heat and is not from some substance which must be evacuated, henna has a very evident benefit. When it is pounded and applied to the forehead as a dressing with vinegar, it calms the headache. It contains a power which is appropriate to the nerves; when it is applied as a poultice it calms these pains. This is not specifically for pain in the head but is generally for all the limbs. It has a constringent property whereby the limbs are strengthened, and when applies as a dressing to the site of the burning inflammation, it calms it.” (Ibn Qayyim; 64) He goes on to state, “Al Bukhari relates, in his History, and Abu Dawud in his sunan, that the Messenger of Allah , if anyone ever complained to him of a pain in the head, would say, ‘Have yourself cupped.’ If anyone complained to him of a pain in the legs, he told them ‘Anoint yourself with henna’ (Abu Dawud, Tarajjul, 188, 19; Talaq 46).

Among its advantages is that it is a useful dissoluent for burns by fire. When used as a poultice, it has a power appropriate to the nerves; when chewed, it is beneficial for ulcers of the mouth and any blisters which occur in it. It heals thrush which occurs in the mouths of children. Bandaging with it is beneficial for hot inflammations, and its effect on abscesses is similar to that of dragon’s blood plant. When its flowers are mixed with warm wax and rose oil, it is good for pains of the side.
When its flowers are put between the folds of woolen clothing, they scent it and keep moths away…When fingernails are smeared with henna paste, it improves and benefits them. When made into a dough with ghee, it can be used as a dressing for the vestiges of hot inflammation which exude yellow liquid, and it is beneficial for them…It causes the hair to grow, strengthens and beautifies it, and strengthens the head. It is good for blisters and pustules occurring on the legs and feet and the rest of the body.

















































Among its advantages is that it is a useful dissoluent for burns by fire. When used as a poultice, it has a power appropriate to the nerves; when chewed, it is beneficial for ulcers of the mouth and any blisters which occur in it. It heals thrush which occurs in the mouths of children. Bandaging with it is beneficial for hot inflammations, and its effect on abscesses is similar to that of dragon’s blood plant. When its flowers are mixed with warm wax and rose oil, it is good for pains of the side.
When its flowers are put between the folds of woolen clothing, they scent it and keep moths away…When fingernails are smeared with henna paste, it improves and benefits them. When made into a dough with ghee, it can be used as a dressing for the vestiges of hot inflammation which exude yellow liquid, and it is beneficial for them…It causes the hair to grow, strengthens and beautifies it, and strengthens the head. It is good for blisters and pustules occurring on the legs and feet and the rest of the body.

 
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